I am in love with this book.

ImageTHE DARK by Lemony Snicket and Illustrated by Jon Klassen is In.Cre.Di.Ble. How did I not know this book existed? There are few picture books that give me goose bumps and this is certainly one of those. The book is about darkness and one little boy’s pervasive fear. Snicket’s writing is gentle and touching. He personifies the dark whilst maintaining its elusive and mysterious qualities. In the end, little boy learns to live in a world where there is darkness. It’s a great book for kids; there is a lesson in it, but not a didactic one. The illustrations are unique. I love the colour scheme and the way the darkness highlights the action. Klassen’s rendering of the story is clever and true to form. 

Go check it out. You can find it at: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15790852-the-dark

 

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The book you probably haven’t heard about, but should have.

The HugThe Hug, written by David Grossman and illustrated by Michal Rovner, is lyrical and beautiful, and the sketches are scarce and powerful.  The brief narrative tackles the challenging subjects of loneliness and intimacy. The story is about a little boy who, upon discovering he is unique, starts to feel small and alone. His mother is there to provide guidance and warmth as he ponders his space and place in the world.

The bare artwork and whitespace are utilised brilliantly and contribute to the ethereal feel of The Hug. Originally published in Hebrew. You can check it out here: http://www.bookdepository.com/Hug-David-Grossman/9781468302738.

 

‘Wuthering Heights’ board book, you say?! Read on…

ImageThe squeal I emitted when I came across this book would have been embarrassing, were I not busy hyperventilating from excitement. There is a set of board books, aimed at babies, which have been appropriated from the classics. The one I purchased was Wuthering Heights – A Weather Primer, by Jennifer Addams, illus by Alison Oliver.

Each book is focused on teaching bubs something by using descriptions from the classic story on which the book is based. For example, in the Wuthering Heights book, the ‘Breezy’ page describes the weather as “…sweet and warm.” So evocative and fun. I think this is a really great concept. The illustrations, too, are unique and engaging.

Other books in the series include Moby-Dick – An Ocean Primer and Jane Eyre – A Counting Primer (both by Jennifer Adams and Alison Oliver). In case you are interested, you can go check them out here: http://www.babylit.com/about/. Go on, you know you want to!

Indestructible books for babies? Yes, they exist. And I LOVE them…

ImageBoy do I love this concept! Board books have a place in my heart, but I still enjoy that special feeling of turning a paper page. I don’t know, it’s all earthy and whatnot. Having a 9-month-old means eventually, everything will go in the mouth. This means traditional paper is out of the question which is a bummer. I think illustrations look best on what was once a crisp white page (and before that a happy, healthy tree…woops…). Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to publish a board book! But I’m so excited about the novel aspect of these indestructibles.

The book my son and I have is called Baby Faces by Amy Pixton and Kate Merritt. The best bit? My boy loves them too! I usually read this book through twice to him.

The pages are just slightly thicker than a standard page, but still very bendy and page-like, and nowhere near as cardboardy as a board book. I don’t know, texture is kind of an added layer when you’re reading a book, wouldn’t you say? Marshall McLuhan and all that? Amiright?

Here’s the link in case you are interested: http://www.indestructiblesinc.com/buy.html

Enjoy!